Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Found in clear rivers and tanks, ponds, beels, and inundated fields. Feeds on plankton and detritus. Grows fairly rapid. Breeds in flooded shallows from June to September. A prolific breeder, laying about 3 million ova per female. A suitable species for aquaculture. Contributes 10 to 15% of the fishery in Cauvery.
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Distribution

Range Description

It has a wide distribution from the Indus plains and adjoining hilly areas in Pakistan; Ganges-Brahmaputra basin, Barak basin in India, Nepal, and Bangladesh; Mahanadi, Krishna, Cuvery, and some smaller basins in southern India; Karnapouli and adjacent smaller basins in Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh; and Myanmar (Roberts 1997, Menon 1999).
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Asia: Indus plain and adjoining hilly areas (Pakistan); (Ganges-Brahmaputra basin (India, Nepal, Bangladesh); Mahanadi, Krishna, Cuvery, and some smaller basins in southern India; Karnapouli and adjacent smaller basins in Chittagong Hill Tracts (Bangladesh) (Ref. 33488). Reported from Myanmar (Ref. 41236).
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Asia.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 89; Vertebrae: 34 - 35
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Size

Maximum size: 560 mm ---
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Max. size

30.0 cm SL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 33488)); max. published weight: 1,360 g (Ref. 4832)
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Diagnostic Description

Body with thin stripes mostly above lateral line; larger fish sometimes with a broad midlateral stripe (not observed in other Cirrhinus. Color in life variable, overall dull dirty white or greyish, silvery or yellow, thin stripes vary from subdued to bold.
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Ecology

Habitat

Indus River Benthopelagic Habitat

This taxon is one of a number of benthopelagic species in the Indus River system. Benthopelagic fish inhabit the water column niche immediately above the bottom, feeding on benthos and zooplankton. Water quality issues in the Indus River habitat have historically been dominated by sediment loading in a watershed which is subject to high natural erosivity, and early disturbance by sedentary agriculture on the floodplains and valleys, which disturbances began in prehistory and continue to the present time. Major tributaries of the Indus rise in the Himalayan Mountains and the Hindu Kush; these influent rivers include the Chenab, Jhelum, Ravi and Sutlej. The Indus mainstem rises on the Tibetan Plateau and flows generally westward.

The Green Revolution has exacerbated water pollution by considerable additions of nitrate to promote crop growth. Other aggravating factors have included increasing amounts of herbicides and pesticides, as pressures to increase crop production expand. Flow of the perennial Indus is dominated by: (a) meltwaters from the Tibetan icefield, the third largest ice sheet formation in the world; (b) snowfall and snowmelt from higher elevation of the watershed; and (c) episodic monsoonal rains that lead to periodic flooding in the Indus River basin.

There are several high trophic level native benthopelagic freshwater fish taxa found in the Indus River system including: the 70 cm scaly osman (Diptychus maculatus), the 30 cm reba (Bangana ariza), the 30 cm Indus snowtrout (Ptychobarbus conirostris), the 30 cm Kunar snowtrout (Schizothorax labiatus), the 35 cm false osman (Schizopygopsis stoliczkai), the 47 cm Chirruh snowtrout (Schizothorax esocinus), and the 40 cm Sattar snowtrout (Schizopyge curvifrons)..

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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It inhabits clear rivers and tanks. A plankton and detritus feeder. Breeding takes place in flooded shallows in June-September. Growth fairly repaid; grows to about 30 cm in natural waters. Male smaller than female (Talwar and Jhingran 1991).

Systems
  • Freshwater
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Environment

benthopelagic; potamodromous (Ref. 51243); freshwater
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Indus River Habitat

There are a number of moderate sized native demersal fish taxa that are found in the Indus River system including: the 70 cm scaly osman (Diptychus maculatus). Major tributaries of the Indus rise in the Himalayan Mountains and the Hindu Kush; these influent rivers include the Chenab, Jhelum, Ravi and Sutlej. The Indus mainstem rises on the Tibetan Plateau and flows generally westward.

The Green Revolution has exacerbated water pollution by considerable additions of nitrate to promote crop growth. Other aggravating factors have included increasing amounts of herbicides and pesticides, as pressures to increase crop production expand. Flow of the perennial Indus is dominated by: (a) meltwaters from the Tibetan icefield, the third largest ice sheet formation in the world; (b) snowfall and snowmelt from higher elevation of the watershed; and (c) episodic monsoonal rains that lead to periodic flooding in the basin.

Other large demersal fish associates in the Indus Basin are the 30 cm reba (Bangana ariza), the 30 cm Indus snowtrout (Ptychobarbus conirostris), the 30 cm Kunar snowtrout (Schizothorax labiatus), the 35 cm false osman (Schizopygopsis stoliczkai), the 47 cm Chirruh snowtrout (Schizothorax esocinus), and the 40 cm Sattar snowtrout (Schizopyge curvifrons).

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Indus River Habitat

The 30 centimeter (cm) long reba (Bangana ariza) is one of several native benthopelagic fish species present in the Indus River and its tributaries. Major tributaries of the Indus rise in the Himalayan Mountains and the Hindu Kush; these influent rivers include the Chenab, Jhelum, Ravi and Sutlej. The Indus mainstem rises on the Tibetan Plateau and flows generally westward.

The Green Revolution has exacerbated water pollution by considerable additions of nitrate to promote crop growth. Other aggravating factors have included increasing amounts of herbicides and pesticides, as pressures to increase crop production expand. Flow of the perennial Indus is dominated by: (a) meltwaters from the Tibetan icefield, the third largest ice sheet formation in the world; (b) snowfall and snowmelt from higher elevation of the watershed; and (c) episodic monsoonal rains that lead to periodic flooding in the basin.

Other large benthopelagic fish inhabit the water column niche immediately above the bottom, feeding on benthos and zooplankton. There are a number of moderate sized native benthopelagic fish taxa that are found in the Indus River system including: the 70 cm scaly osman (Diptychus maculatus), the 30 cm Indus snowtrout (Ptychobarbus conirostris), the 30 cm Kunar snowtrout (Schizothorax labiatus), the 35 cm false osman (Schizopygopsis stoliczkai), the 47 cm Chirruh snowtrout (Schizothorax esocinus), and the 40 cm Sattar snowtrout (Schizopyge curvifrons).

  • C.Michael Hogan. 2012. Indus River. Eds. P.Saundry & C.Cleveland. Encyclopedia of Earth. National Council for Science and the Environment. Washington DC http://www.eoearth.org/article/Indus_River
  • Fishbase. 2010. Fish species in the Indus River Basin
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Migration

Potamodromous. Migrating within streams, migratory in rivers, e.g. Saliminus, Moxostoma, Labeo. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.
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Trophic Strategy

Found in clear rivers and tanks, ponds, beels, and inundated fields. Feeds on plankton and detritus.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Bangana ariza

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Bangana ariza

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Labeo ariza

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 2 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

CTCTATTTAGTATTTGGTGCCTGAGCCGGAATGGTAGGAACCGCACTA---AGCCTCCTCATTCGGGCCGAACTCAGTCAACCCGGATCACTTCTAGGTGAC---GACCAAATTTACAATGTTATTGTTACTGCCCACGCCTTTGTAATAATTTTCTTTATAGTAATGCCAATCCTCATTGGGGGATTTGGAAACTGACTCGTACCATTAATG---ATCGGAGCTCCAGACATAGCATTCCCACGAATAAATAATATAAGCTTCTGACTCCTACCCCCATCATTTCTACTACTACTAGCCTCTTCTGGCGTTGAAGCCGGAGCAGGAACCGGATGAACAGTCTATCCACCCCTGGCAGGCAACTTAGCCCACGCAGGAGCATCAGTAGACTTA---ACAATTTTCTCACTCCACCTGGCAGGTGTATCATCAATTCTAGGGGCCATCAACTTCATTACTACAACTATTAACATGAAACCCCCAGCTATTTCTCAATATCAAACACCCCTATTCGTTTGATCTGTGTTAGTAACCGCCGTTCTACTCCTACTATCACTACCAGTTCTAGCCGCC---GGCATTACAATACTTCTAACAGATCGAAACCTTAATACTACATTCTTTGATCCGGCAGGAGGAGGAGACCCAATTCTCTACCAGCACTTA
-- end --

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Labeo ariza

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Dahanukar, N.

Reviewer/s
Kar, D, Rema Devi, K.R., Datta, N.C. & Juffe Bignoli, D.

Contributor/s
Molur, S.

Justification

Labeo ariza is a common species with no known major widespread threats. It is therefore assessed as Least Concern.

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Population

Population
No population status data is available but the species is fairly common in most parts of its distribution range. This species is also locally cultivated for consumption.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats

The threats to this species are not known.

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Least Concern (LC)
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions

More research about distribution, biology and trends of this species is needed; especially, impacts of harvest.

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: commercial
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Wikipedia

Bangana ariza

Bangana ariza, the Reba, is a cyprinid fish found in India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan.

References


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