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Overview

Brief Summary

What so unusual is about the lumpsucker is the suction cup situated under the bellies of the adult animals. The lumpsucker uses this to fasten itself to the seabed. The fish is fairly common along the Dutch coast. Lumpsuckers grow up to a half meter long and a weight of 5 kilograms. They eat zooplankton and snails which live between stones and seaweed.
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Comprehensive Description

Biology

Basically solitary rather than a schooling fish. Exhibits a homing instinct (Ref. 9737). Inhabits rocky bottoms but may occur among floating seaweed. Migrates considerable distances in an annual cycle between deeper waters in winter and shallower waters in summer (Ref. 26141). Maximum depth reported at 868 m (Ref. 58426). Epibenthic-pelagic (Ref. 58426). During the spawning season the male becomes reddish in color on the underside, whereas the female is blue-green. Feeds on ctenophores, medusas, small crustaceans, polychaetes, jelly fish and small fishes. Valued for their eggs, which make an inexpensive caviar (Ref. 9988). Eaten in Nordic countries, marketed fresh or smoked. Male flesh is most demanded and roe is sold fresh (Ref. 35388).
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Description

 The ventral fins of the lumpsucker are modified to form a suction disc used to cling to rocky substrates. The skin is coloured slate grey to blue and is scaleless. Small bony lumps cover the body, with lateral rows of larger bony thorns along the body. The dorsal fin is situated behind a distinct dorsal ridge that is taller in the females. Adults grow between 30-50 cm in length.The colouring in the males changes to blue dorsally and red or orange ventrally during the breeding season. Between February and May, females lay their eggs in shallow coastal waters. Males guard the eggs for 6-7 weeks. The newly hatched fish are 6-7 mm in length and have a 'tadpole like' form. Eggs of the lumpsucker are also commercially harvested as a form of caviar.
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Distribution

Hudson Bay to James Bay; Labrador to New Jersey; rarely to Chesapeake Bay and Bermuda
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Western Atlantic: Nunavut, Hudson Bay to James Bay and Labrador in Canada to New Jersey in USA; rarely to Chesapeake Bay in USA and Bermuda. Eastern Atlantic: Barents Sea, Iceland and Greenland to Spain (Ref. 4701).
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Baltic Sea, North Sea, North Atlantic, Arctic Ocean.
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Western Atlantic: Hudson Bay to James Bay and Labarador in Canada to New Jersey in USA; rarely to Chesapeake Bay in USA and Bermuda. Eastern Atlantic: Barents Sea, Iceland and Greenland to Spain.
  • Bigelow, H.B. and Schroeder, W.C., 1953; Stein, D.L., 1986; M?r Christensen, J., 1977; Davenport, J., 1985; Flintegård, H., 1999; Whiteheat, P.J.P., Bauchot, M.-L., Hureau, J.-C., Nielsen, J., Tortonese, E., 1984.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 5 - 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9 - 11; Analspines: 0; Analsoft rays: 9 - 10; Vertebrae: 28 - 29
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Size

Maximum size: 600 mm TL
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Max. size

61.0 cm NG (male/unsexed; (Ref. 58426)); 42.9 cm SL (female); max. published weight: 9,500 g (Ref. 4701); max. published weight: 5,000.0 g
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to 60 cm TL (male/unsexed); max.weight: 9,500.0 g.
  • Bigelow, H.B. and Schroeder, W.C., 1953; Stein, D.L., 1986; M?r Christensen, J., 1977; Davenport, J., 1985; Flintegård, H., 1999; Whiteheat, P.J.P., Bauchot, M.-L., Hureau, J.-C., Nielsen, J., Tortonese, E., 1984.
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Diagnostic Description

First dorsal fin present but covered by thick layer of skin forming a characteristic high crest with embedded spines. Bony tubercles present, arranged in 3 widely separated rows of large flattened tubercles on each side of body. Gill openings large, extend- extending below level of upper pectoral fin ray. Pyloric present 36-79. Ventral sucking disc formed by the modified pelvic fin (Ref. 232).
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Ecology

Habitat

nektonic
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Found in cold to temperate waters on rocky bottoms or floating among seaweeds.
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Habitat Type: Marine

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Environment

benthopelagic; oceanodromous (Ref. 51243); marine; depth range 0 - 868 m (Ref. 58496), usually 50 - 150 m (Ref. 4701)
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Depth range based on 11631 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 7169 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): -9 - 1105
  Temperature range (°C): -2.072 - 20.092
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.664 - 22.184
  Salinity (PPS): 6.095 - 36.742
  Oxygen (ml/l): 0.982 - 8.544
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.060 - 2.380
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.077 - 51.283

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): -9 - 1105

Temperature range (°C): -2.072 - 20.092

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.664 - 22.184

Salinity (PPS): 6.095 - 36.742

Oxygen (ml/l): 0.982 - 8.544

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.060 - 2.380

Silicate (umol/l): 1.077 - 51.283
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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 Inhabits deep waters from 50 m down to 300 m depth. However, migration to shallower waters occurs during spawning.
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Depth: 50 - 400m.
From 50 to 400 meters.

Habitat: benthopelagic. Basically solitary rather than a schooling fish. Exhibits a homing instinct (Ref. 9737). Inhabits rocky bottoms but may occur among floating seaweed. During the spawning season the male becomes reddish in colour on the underside, whereas the female is blue-green. Feeds on ctenophores, medusae, small crustaceans, polychaetes and small fishes. Valued for their eggs, which make an inexpensive caviar (Ref. 9988).
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Benthopelagic; marine; depth range; 50-400 m. Basically solitary rather than a schooling fish. Exhibits a homing instinct. Inhabits rocky bottoms but may occur among floating seaweed. Migrates considerable distances in an annual cycle between deeper waters in winter and shallower waters in summer.
  • Bigelow, H.B. and Schroeder, W.C., 1953; Stein, D.L., 1986; M?r Christensen, J., 1977; Davenport, J., 1985; Flintegård, H., 1999; Whiteheat, P.J.P., Bauchot, M.-L., Hureau, J.-C., Nielsen, J., Tortonese, E., 1984.
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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Oceanodromous. Migrating within oceans typically between spawning and different feeding areas, as tunas do. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.
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Trophic Strategy

Its distributional range indicate that it is fairly eurythermal (Ref. 9737). Basically solitary rather than a schooling fish. Exhibits a homing instinct (Ref. 9737). Inhabits rocky bottoms but may occur among floating seaweed. Migrates considerable distances in an annual cycle between deeper waters in winter and shallower waters in summer (Ref. 26141). Epibenthic-pelagic (Ref. 58426). Feeds more intensively in the winter. Preferred food items are ctenophores, medusae, small crustaceans, polychaetes and small fishes (Ref. 4701). It is preyed upon by seals, sperm whale and Greenland shark. Parasites of the species include 3 protozoans and 2 copepods (Ref. 5951).
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Feeds on ctenophores, medusae, small crustaceans, polychaetes, jelly fish and small fishes.
  • Bigelow, H.B. and Schroeder, W.C., 1953; Stein, D.L., 1986; M?r Christensen, J., 1977; Davenport, J., 1985; Flintegård, H., 1999; Whiteheat, P.J.P., Bauchot, M.-L., Hureau, J.-C., Nielsen, J., Tortonese, E., 1984.
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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Diet

Feeds on cnetophores, medusae, small crustaceans, polychaetes, jelly fish and small fishes
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Life Cycle

Eggs are laid in large numbers on stony bottoms (Ref. 9900). Male guards egg-mass aggressively.
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Reproduction

Fish move inshore to spawn in summer when water reaches 8 C. During the spawning season the male becomes reddish in color on the underside, and the female becomes blue-green. Eggs are laid in on stony bottoms of up to 300,000 eggs, 2.2-2.7 mm in diameter. Males aggressively guard egg masses.
  • Bigelow, H.B. and Schroeder, W.C., 1953; Stein, D.L., 1986; M?r Christensen, J., 1977; Davenport, J., 1985; Flintegård, H., 1999; Whiteheat, P.J.P., Bauchot, M.-L., Hureau, J.-C., Nielsen, J., Tortonese, E., 1984.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Cyclopterus lumpus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 2 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

ACCCTTTATCTAGTATTTGGTGCTTGAGCCGGAATGGTCGGGACAGGCCTA---AGCCTTTTAATCCGGGCCGAGCTAAGCCAACCCGGGGCCCTCTTGGGCGAC---GACCAAATTTACAACGTTATTGTTACGGCTCATGCTTTCGTAATAATTTTCTTTATAGTAATACCAATCATAATCGGGGGCTTTGGAAATTGACTCATCCCCCTAATA---ATCGGCGCCCCCGATATAGCATTCCCTCGAATAAACAACATGAGTTTTTGACTTTTACCCCCTTCTTTCCTATTGCTTCTTGCCTCTTCGGGCGTCGAAGCAGGGGCCGGAACCGGGTGAACCGTCTACCCTCCTTTAGCAGGTAACCTGGCACACGCCGGGGCCTCTGTCGACTTA---ACGATCTTTTCTTTACACCTCGCGGGAATCTCTTCAATCCTCGGAGCAATTAATTTTATTACAACTATCATCAACATGAAGCCCCCTGCTATGTCCCAGTACCAGACTCCCCTATTTGTGTGATCTGTCCTTATTACTGCCGTACTACTACTTCTCTCCCTCCCTGTCCTTGCCGCT---GGCATTACAATGCTACTAACAGACCGCAACCTTAACACCACCTTCTTCGACCCAGCAGGGGGCGGGGACCCCATTCTTTACCAACATCTC
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cyclopterus lumpus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 26
Specimens with Barcodes: 53
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Genomic DNA is available from 11 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at Biodiversity Institute of Ontario
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Threats

Not Evaluated
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: commercial; aquarium: public aquariums; bait: usually
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Wikipedia

Cyclopterus lumpus

Cyclopterus lumpus, the lumpsucker or lumpfish, is a species of marine fish in the family Cyclopteridae (lumpsuckers). It is the only member of the genus Cyclopterus.[1] It is found over rocky bottoms in the North Atlantic and adjacent parts of the Arctic Ocean, ranging as far south as Chesapeake Bay (rare south of New Jersey) on the North American coast and Spain on the European coast.[2]

Description[edit]

Males typically reach 30–40 cm (12–16 in) in length and the larger females rarely surpass 50 cm (20 in) in length and 5 kg (11 lb) in weight.[3] The maximum is 61 cm (24 in) in length and 9.5 kg (21 lb) in weight,.[2] The body is ball-like. It has a knobbly, ridged back and three large bony tubercles on each flank. Its pelvic fins form suction discs which it uses to attach strongly to rocks or other surfaces. The head and the pectoral fins of males are larger than those of females. It has a jelly-like layer of fat under the skin which makes it appear to quiver when held in the hand.[4] Its colour is highly variable; bluish, greyish, olive, yellowish or brownish.[5] Mature males, which turn reddish during the breeding season, are brighter than females.[5]

Biology[edit]

This fish lives in shallow water and remains attached to the substrate for most of the time except when breeding. They feed on small fish and invertebrates.[4] The female can carry 100,000–350,000 eggs, which are laid in a "nest" that is made in relatively shallow water by the male.[3] The male also guards and cares for the eggs by fanning them with his fins during the month-long incubation period.[5] The larvae soon attach themselves to seaweed with their suckers.[4]

Uses[edit]

It is often caught for the roe, made into an inexpensive caviar, and the flesh is eaten in Scandinavia.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2012). Species of Cyclopterus in FishBase. July 2012 version.
  2. ^ a b c Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2012). "Cyclopterus lumpus" in FishBase. July 2012 version.
  3. ^ a b Muus, B., J. G. Nielsen, P. Dahlstrom and B. Nystrom (1999). Sea Fish. pp. 180–181. ISBN 8790787005
  4. ^ a b c "Lumpfish: Cyclopterus lumpus". NatureGate. Retrieved 2013-12-16. 
  5. ^ a b c Kells, V., and K. Carpenter (2011). A Field Guide to the Coastal Fishes from Maine to Texas. pp. 192–193. ISBN 978-0-8018-9838-9
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