Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species occurs in foothills and highlands as well as in 'pine barrens' along the coast. Its altitudinal range is from 100-900(-1,200) m a.s.l. Pinus cubensis forms mostly pure but open stands or is invasive in disturbed sites on serpentine or serpentine-derived, often ferruginous soils ("Nipe latosol" or "Nipe clay"), or on alluvial sediment near the coast. In the highlands there is abundant rainfall (1,800 mm or more annually), but a dry winter season is a typical aspect of the tropical to subtropical climate. Phenology: time of pollen dispersal is not recorded.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Pinus cubensis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pinus cubensis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 11
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Farjon, A.

Reviewer/s
Thomas, P.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has a relatively limited extent of occurrence and area of occupancy (the latter estimated on a rather wide grid base around each map dot as it is open forest forming over extensive areas) indicating that it might qualify as Near Threatened, but there is no evident decline. The species, being a pioneer in secondary forest, may even be on the increase after disturbance of primary forest. It is therefore listed Least Concern.
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Population

Population
Populations are either stable or expanding.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
No specific threats have been identified for this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is known from several protected areas. It is also a pioneer species in secondary vegetation.
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Wikipedia

Cuban pine

Pinus cubensis, or Cuban pine, is a pine endemic to the eastern highlands of the island of Cuba, inhabiting both Sierra Nipe-Cristal and Sierra Maestra.

The closely related Hispaniolan pine (P. occidentalis), native to the neighboring island of Hispaniola, is treated as synonymous by some botanists. Modern systematic studies recognize P. cubensis it as a valid species,[1] nevertheless, there is disagreement about whether the Sierra Maestra populations in the south are part of P. cubensis or conform another species named Pinus maestrensis.[2]

The Sierra Nipe-Cristal and Sierra Maestra population may have diverged recently, as indicated by recent genetic studies that have found some ancestral genetic lineages that are shared among the two regions and only some rare variants exclusive for each region.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Farjon, A. 1997: Pinus (Pinaceae), Flora Neotropica, Monograph 75 (together with Brian T. Styles). New York : The New York Botanical Garden. ISBN 0-89327-411-9
  2. ^ López-Almirall A. 1982. Variabilidad del Género Pinus (Coniferales: Pinaceae) en Cuba. Acta Botánica Cubana 12: 1–32.
  3. ^ Jardón-Barbolla, L., Delgado-Valerio, P., Geada-López, G., Vázquez-Lobo, A., & Pinero D. (2011). Phylogeography of Pinus subsection Australes in the Caribbean Basin. Annals of Botany 107: 229-241.
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