Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is a constituent of relatively open, often secondary pine-oak forests, or it occurs with Pinus oocarpa invading burned mountainsides. It is well adapted to withstand fires by its juvenile "grass stage" similar to that of P. palustris of the SE USA. The pines most commonly associated with it vary somewhat from north to south and include P. oocarpa, P. montezumae, P. pseudostrobus, and P. maximinoi and less frequently P. cembroides at lower altitudes and P. hartwegii at higher altitudes. Common are also Quercus, Liquidambar, and in the understorey Calliandra, Leucaena, Acacia, Dodonaea, Gaultheria, and Mimosa. Its altitudinal range is (700-)900-2,500(-3,000) m a.s.l. Pinus devoniana grows on a variety of soils, often of volcanic origin. The climate is warm-temperate to subtropical, with annual precipitation 1,000-1,500 mm and a dry season from November to May.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Pinus devoniana

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pinus devoniana

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 27
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Farjon, A.

Reviewer/s
Thomas, P. & Perez de la Rosa, J.

Contributor/s

Justification

A widespread and common species that is not an important timber tree and is unlikely to be much reduced in secondary forest types.


History
  • 1998
    Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
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Population

Population
The population is thought to be stable.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
No specific threats have been identified for this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species has been recorded from several protected areas; it is also present in secondary forests following logging and other activities.
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Wikipedia

Pinus devoniana

Pinus devoniana is a species of conifer in the Pinaceae family. It is found in Mexico - from S. Sinaloa to Chiapas - and Guatemala in montane, relatively open pine or pine-oak forests at altitudes from 900 to 2500 m.[1]

Pinus devoniana, which is locally called “Pino blanco”, “Pino lacio” or “Pino prieto”, is a tree of medium size, which can grow 20–30 m. tall, with a dbh to 80–100 cm. It has curved foliage twigs and very long needles, from 25–40 cm. in fascicles of 5. The cones, which grow solitary or in whorls of 2-4 on thick, short peduncles, leaving a few scales on the branch when falling, are usually large and often curved, 15–35 cm. long and 8–15 cm. wide when open.[2]

Pinus devoniana is closely related to Pinus montezumae (the Montezuma Pine).[3] These species are sometimes difficult to distinguish, while hybrids probably occur. The cones are especially variable. Overall, both foliage and cones are larger in Pinus devoniana.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Farjon et al. 1997, p. 58, Farjon 2001, p. 175
  2. ^ Farjon et al. 1997, p. 58, Farjon and Styles 1997, p. 137
  3. ^ Kent 1900, p. 345, Dallimore and Jackson 1954, p. 504 and Farjon 1984, p. 115 treat P. devoniana as a synonym of P. montezumae
  4. ^ Farjon et al. Kew 1997, p. 58

Literature and sources[edit]

  • Dallimore, W. and Bruce Jackson – A handbook of Coniferae. Edward Arnold Publishers, London 1923, 2nd ed. 1931, 3rd ed. 1948, reprinted 1954
  • Farjon, Aljos – Pines; drawings and descriptions of the genus Pinus. Brill/Backhuys, Leiden 1984
  • Farjon, Aljos, Jorge A. Perez de la Rosa & Brian T. Styles (ill. Rosemary Wise) – A field guide to the Pines of Mexico and Central America. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, in association with the Oxford Forestry Institute, Oxford 1997
  • Farjon, Aljos and Brian T. Styles – Pinus (Pinaceae); monograph 75 of Flora Neotropica. New York Botanical Gardens, New York 1997
  • Farjon, Aljos – World checklist and bibliography of Conifers. Second edition. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew 2001
  • IUCN - Conifer Specialist Group 1998: Pinus devoniana in 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Conservation status downloaded on 10 July 2007.
  • Kent, Adolphus H. – Veitch's Manual of the Coniferae. James Veitch & Sons, Chelsea 1900.
  • Lanyon, Joyce W. - A card key to Pinus based on needle anatomy. Min. for Conservation, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia 1966
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