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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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introduced; B.C., Nfld. and Labr. (Nfld.), Ont.; Ala., Ark., Conn., Ga., Ill., Ind., Ky., La., Md., Mass., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.J., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Oreg., Pa., R.I., S.C., Tenn., Tex., Va., Wash.; w Europe; expected naturalized elsewhere.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Bulbs ovoid, 3–5 × 2–3 cm, tunic pale brown. Leaves 3–4; blade flat, 20–45 cm × 5–12(–15) mm, glaucous. Inflorescences 1-flowered, 25–50 cm; spathe pale brown, 2–3 cm, papery. Flowers fragrant; perianth white, 5–7 cm wide; perianth tube 1.5–2 cm, tapering abruptly to base; distinct portions of tepals erect to spreading, yellow, often twisted, oblanceolate, 2.5–3.5 × 1–1.5 cm, apex acute; corona yellow, tubular, 30–35 × 15–25 mm, apex flared and ruffled; stamens uniseriate, exserted to ca. midlength of corona; style exserted 2–5 mm beyond anthers; pedicel 5–10 mm. 2n = 14.
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Ecology

Habitat

Roadsides, fields, waste places; 0--1000m.
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Associations

Plant / epiphyte
long stalked apothecium of Botryotinia narcissicola grows on dead, overwintered, sclerotioid leaf of Narcissus pseudonarcissus
Remarks: season: 2-3

Plant / epiphyte
long stalked apothecium of Botryotinia polyblastis grows on dead, overwintered, sclerotioid leaf of Narcissus pseudonarcissus
Remarks: season: 2-3

Foodplant / pathogen
Narcissus Yellow Stripe virus infects and damages colour-breaked flower of Narcissus pseudonarcissus

Foodplant / parasite
epiphyllous telium of Puccinia schroeteri parasitises live leaf of Narcissus pseudonarcissus

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / spot causer
amphigenous colony of Ramularia anamorph of Ramularia vallisumbrosae causes spots on live stem of Narcissus pseudonarcissus

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering spring.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Narcissus pseudonarcissus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Narcissus pseudonarcissus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Narcissus pseudonarcissus

Narcissus pseudonarcissus (commonly known as wild daffodil or Lent lily) is a perennial flowering plant which grows from a bulb. It has pale yellow flowers with a darker central trumpet. The long, narrow leaves are slightly greyish in colour and rise from the base of the stem.

Contents

Distribution

The species is native to Western Europe from Spain and Portugal east to Germany and north to England and Wales. It is commonly grown in gardens and populations have become established in many other parts of Europe. Wild plants grow in woods, grassland and on rocky ground. In Britain native populations have decreased substantially since the 19th century due to intensification of agriculture, clearance of woodland and uprooting of the bulbs for use in gardens. In Germany it was a subject of a nationally awareness campaign for the protection of wildflowers in 1981.

Subspecies

There are a number of subspecies of the wild daffodil but the exact number varies according to different authors. The large number of cultivars adds to the difficulty of classification. Among the subspecies is the Tenby daffodil (N. p. ssp. obvallaris, sometimes classed as a separate species) which probably originated in cultivation but now grows wild in south-west Wales.

Emblem

The daffodil is the national flower of Wales, and also the County flower of Gloucestershire.[1]

References

  1. ^ Plantlife website County Flowers page

External references

  1. Narcissus pseudonarcissus - Plants For A Future database report
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Notes

Comments

Narcissus pseudonarcissus is the most variable species in the genus and includes many elements that sometimes have been recognized as separate species (e.g., H. W. Pugsley 1933). An old cultivated variety, “Telemonius Plenus,” with highly doubled flowers, commonly persists, although it does not reseed. Natural hybrids between N. pseudonarcissus and N. poeticus (N. ×incomparabilis Miller) have 1-flowered inflorescences and yellow flowers with the corona about half as long as the distinct portions of the tepals. They are known to persist in Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Virginia. Natural hybrids between N. pseudonarcissus and N. jonquilla (N. ×odorus Linnaeus) have 1–4-flowered inflorescences and bright yellow flowers with the corona one-half to three-fourths as long as the distinct portions of the tepals. They are known to persist in Louisiana, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia.
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