Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / pathogen
Cucumber Mosaic virus infects and damages yellowish then grey or necrotic, elongately flecked leaf (lily symptomless virus infected) of Lilium auratum

Foodplant / pathogen
Lily Symptomless virus infects and damages yellowish then grey or necrotic, elongately flecked leaf (cucumber mosaic infected) of Lilium auratum
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / pathogen
Tulip Breaking virus infects and damages severely mottled leaf of Lilium auratum
Other: major host/prey

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Lilium auratum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Lilium auratum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Lilium auratum

Lilium auratum (山百合 yamayuri; literally "mountain lily") is one of the true lilies. It is native to Japan and is sometimes called the golden rayed lily of Japan or the goldband lily.

Contents

Description[edit]

The flower colour is typically white with gold radial markings and orange spots, but variations in flower colour and markings are known. For example the variety platyphyllum which bears a gold stripe along the tepals but lacks spots.[1] The strongly scented flowers are the largest of any lily species and the largest plants, which can reach 2.5 metres (8 ft), can carry up to twenty of these.

It has been used widely in breeding and many of the more spectacular modern cultivars are derived in part from this species.

Lilium auratum var. auratum pollen

Cultivation[edit]

This lily does well in plain or acidic soil; rich or fertilised soil will kill the plant. Bulbs should be planted in a hole three times their size in both depth and width in a well drained area. The best position for this plant is one where its top will receive sunlight while its base remains shaded.

This lily can be cultivated by seed, but for faster reproduction scaling is recommended. Its life span (around 3 or 4 years) is significantly less than that of its descendants, so reproducing this plant is important for gardeners.

Chemistry[edit]

L. auratum contains phenolic glycerides such as 1,2-O-diferuloylglycerol, 1-O-feruloyl-2-O-p-coumaroylglycerol, 1-O-p-coumaroyl-2-O-feruloylglycerol, 1-O-feruloylglycerol, 1,3-O-diferuloylglycerol, 1-O-feruloyl-3-O-p-coumaroylglycerol and 1-O-p-coumaroylglycerol.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The RHS Encyclopedia of Garden Plants, Christopher Brickell, Dorling Kindersley, London, 1996, p613. ISBN 0-7513-0436-0
  2. ^ Phenolic glycerides from Lilium auratum. Hiroko Shimomura, Yutaka Sashida and Yoshihiro Mimaki, Phytochemistry, 1987, Volume 26, Issue 3, Pages 844–845, doi:10.1016/S0031-9422(00)84801-3


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