Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Ariz., Calif., Colo., Idaho, Mont., Nebr., Nev., N.Mex., N.Dak., Oreg., S.Dak., Utah, Wyo.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants 5–10 cm. Leaves spreading; blade 10–20 cm × 2–8 mm; sheath 3–8 cm × 5–8 mm, distalmost occasionally fibrous. Flowers: perianth 5–10(–12) cm, tube (4–)5–8(–10) cm; tepals 2–2.5 cm × 3–7 mm; anthers 4–6 mm; pedicel slender, 0.5–3 cm. Capsules 5–8 mm. Seeds 3–4 mm. 2n = 22, 26, 28, ca. 50.
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Ecology

Habitat

Scrub flats, short-grass prairie, sagebrush deserts to open montane forests, sandy to rocky areas; 800--2400m.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering spring (Mar--Jun).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Leucocrinum montanum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Leucocrinum montanum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Leucocrinum

Leucocrinum montanum, commonly known as the sand lily, starlily or mountain lily, is the only species in the monotypic genus Leucocrinum, placed in the family Asparagaceae, subfamily Agavoideae.[1] It is a perennial plant native to western North America growing to 0.2 meters that flowers in late spring and early summer. The flowers are monoecious. Early in spring, the waxy-white flowers arise from a cluster of leaves that look much like a tuft of grass. Then, by midsummer, the plant disappears completely from the surface and lies dormant underground through the hottest part of the year. Unlike most lilies, L. montanum has fleshy finger-like roots instead of a bulb.

References

  1. ^ Chase, M.W.; Reveal, J.L. & Fay, M.F. (2009), "A subfamilial classification for the expanded asparagalean families Amaryllidaceae, Asparagaceae and Xanthorrhoeaceae", Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 161 (2): 132–136, doi:10.1111/j.1095-8339.2009.00999.x 
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Notes

Comments

Leucocrinum montanum exhibits an unusual chromosomal and pollen heteromorphism (M. S. Cave 1970; R. Ornduff and M. S. Cave 1975). Populations from the Rocky Mountain region, Utah, and central and eastern Nevada shed their pollen in monads and have x = 14, while populations from extreme western Nevada, California, and Oregon all shed tetrads and have x = 13. The occurrence of intraspecific dimorphism in pollen shedding is extremely rare. 

 The showy flowers of Leucocrinum montanum (L. S. Hannibal 1976; H. Rickabaugh 1975) with their long, white floral tubes are reportedly fragrant (V. A. Matthews 1986), and the subterranean capsules are more or less sessile on the rootstocks. Native Americans have eaten the roots (G. Kunkel 1984), and the Paiute and Shoshone tribes used the plant as a dermatological aid (D. E. Moerman 1986).

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