Overview

Distribution

Anhui, Shandong [Korea].
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Bulb subglobose, 2.5--4 cm in diam.; scales white, lanceolate, 2--2.5 cm × 6--8 mm, not articulate. Stem 40--85 cm, not papillose. Leaves in 1 or 2 whorls of 5--14 plus a few scattered, shortly petiolate, oblong-oblanceolate to narrowly elliptic, 10--15 × 2--4 cm, glabrous. Bracts 4--5.5 × 0.8--1.5 cm. Flowers solitary or 2--7 in a raceme, erect. Tepals orange or vermilion, with purple-red spots, narrowly elliptic, 4.8--5.2 × 1.2--1.4 cm; nectaries not papillose. Filaments ca. 3 cm, glabrous; anthers orange. Ovary 0.8--1.2 cm × 3--4 mm. Style ca. 2 × as long as ovary. Fl. Jun, fr. Aug. 2 n = 24*.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

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Type Information

Isotype for Lilium tsingtauense Gilg
Catalog Number: US 795463
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): F. von Zimmermann
Year Collected: 1901
Locality: Tsingtau., Shantung, China, Asia-Temperate
  • Isotype: Gilg, E. F. 1904. Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 34 (Beibl. 75): 24.
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Ecology

Habitat

Sunny forested slopes, bushy and grassy places; 100--400 m.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Lilium tsingtauense

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Lilium tsingtauense

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Lilium tsingtauense

Lilium tsingtauense (also known as "Twilight Lily") is a species of lily native to East China and Korea. It is a medium sized herb that grows as a single stem from a scaly bulb. It has smooth, inversely lanceolate leaves, about 13 centimetres (5.1 in) long and mostly in 2 whorls. The plant bears loose umbels of 6 (but may be up to 15) upright, unscented, shallow trumpet-shaped flowers, that blossom under partial sunlight. These appear in midsummer and are orange or reddish-orange with maroon spots. The plant is about 70–100 centimetres (28–39 in) tall.[1]

It is named for the city of Tsingtao (Qingdao) in The People's Republic of China.[2]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ Christopher Brickell (1996). The RHS Encyclopedia of Garden Plants. London: Dorling Kindersley Ltd. p. 617. ISBN 0-7513-0436-0. 
  2. ^ Allen J Coombes (1985). The Hamlyn Guide to Plant Names. London: Reed International Books. p. 118. ISBN 0-600-57545-4. 

Further reading[edit source | edit]


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