Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Mexico

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Tex.; Mexico (Coahuila).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Leaf blades dark green, barely constricted along length, 5–12.5 × 0.1–0.25 dm, margins with slender threads. Panicles 1–2.5 m. Flowers: perianth narrowly tubular; tepals rosy red to salmon, 2.5–3.5 cm. Capsules 2.5–3 cm. Seeds 9–10 × 6–7 mm.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Yucca parviflora J. Torrey in W. H. Emory, Rep. U.S. Mex. Bound. 2(1): 221. 1859; Aloe yuccaefolia A. Gray; Hesperaloe engelmannii Krauskopf; H. parviflora var. engelmannii (Krauskopf) Trelease; H. yuccaefolia (A. Gray) Engelmann
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Prairies, rocky slopes, and mesquite thickets; to 600m.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering late winter--early summer.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Mexico

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Restricted to central and southwest Texas, and Mexico (Powell 1998, Diggs et al. 1999). Found in prairies, rocky slopes, limestone hills, arroyos, and mesquite groves (Correll and Johnston 1970, Powell 1998). Infrequent to rare across its range (Powell 1998).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Hesperaloe parviflora

Hesperaloe parviflora, also known as Red Yucca, Hummingbird Yucca, and Samandoque, is a plant which is native to Chihuahuan desert of west Texas east and south into central and south Texas and northeastern Mexico around Coahuila.[2]

Hesperaloe parviflora has narrow evergreen leaves with a fringe along their edges of white threadlike hairs and grows in clumps 3–6 ft (0.91–1.8 m) high and wide. Red or yellow tubular flowers are held on branching flower stalks (inflorescences) up to 5 ft (1.5 m) tall from late spring to mid-summer.[3]

This Hesperaloe species has become popular in xeriscape landscape design for public and private gardens in California and the Southwestern United States. The plant's qualities include drought tolerance, heat resistance, low maintenance needs, hummingbird attracting flowers,[4] and an architectural form. It also is a spineless alternative to Agave and Yucca horticultural species.[5]

References

  1. ^ "Hesperaloe parviflora (Torr.) J. M. Coult.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2007-02-15. http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?18924. Retrieved 2010-08-13. 
  2. ^ http://swbiodiversity.org/seinet/taxa/index.php?taxon=17237 Southwest Biodiversity
  3. ^ http://www.sanmarcosgrowers.com/products/plants/plantdisplay.asp?plant_id=831 San Marcos
  4. ^ http://ag.arizona.edu/pima/gardening/aridplants/Hesperaloe_parviflora.html University of Arizona
  5. ^ [1] San Marcos
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Hesperaloe parviflora is widely cultivated in arid and semiarid regions, both as roadside plantings and as landscaping elements.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!