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Overview

Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Hemerocallis flava (L.) L.:
Canada (North America)
Mexico (Mesoamerica)
United States (North America)
Colombia (South America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
  • Breedlove, D. E. 1986. Flora de Chiapas. Listados Floríst. México 4: i–v, 1–246.   http://www.tropicos.org/Reference/513 External link.
  • Idárraga-Piedrahita, A., R. D. C. Ortiz, R. Callejas Posada & M. Merello. 2011. Flora de Antioquia. Catálogo de las Plantas Vasculares, vol. 2. Listado de las Plantas Vasculares del Departamento de Antioquia. Pp. 1-939.   http://www.tropicos.org/Reference/100008595 External link.
  • Gleason, H. A. & A. J. Cronquist. 1968. The Pteridophytoa, Gymnospermae and Monocotyledoneae. 1: 1–482. In H. A. Gleason Ill. Fl. N. U.S. (ed. 3). New York Botanical Garden, New York.   http://www.tropicos.org/Reference/1495 External link.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus L.:
China (Asia)
Japan (Asia)
Mexico (Mesoamerica)
Russian Federation (Asia)
South Korea (Asia)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Gansu, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Henan, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Jilin, Liaoning, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi [Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Russia (Siberia); Europe].
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introduced; N.B., Ont., Que.; Ark., Conn., Ill., Ind., Ky., Maine, Md., Mass., Mich., Minn., Miss., N.J., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Pa., R.I., Texas, Vt., Va., W.Va., Wis.; e Asia; naturalized Europe.
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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants 70--80 cm tall, deciduous in winter. Roots slightly fleshy or ropelike, sometimes with a swollen, tuberous part. Leaves linear, 20--70 × 0.3--1.2 cm, apex acuminate. Scape generally slightly shorter than leaves, solid; main axis distinct; sterile bracts present. Inflorescence branched; helicoidal cymes 2--4(or 5), 2--4(or 5)-flowered; bracts lanceolate, 2--6(--8) cm × 5--7 mm. Pedicel 1--2 cm. Flowers fragrant, opening in afternoon and lasting 1--3 days, blackish purple or green apically in bud. Perianth lemon-colored; tube 1.5--2.5 cm; segments spreading, 5--7 × 1.3--1.6 cm, inner ones slightly wider than outer. Filaments 5--5.5 cm; anthers yellow, sometimes purple-black adaxially, ca. 8 mm. Capsule ellipsoid, ca. 2.4 × 1.2 cm. Fl. Jun--Aug. 2 n = 22.
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Description

Plants 5–10 dm; roots enlarged, fibrous. Leaf blade dark green, 5–6.5 dm × 0.8–1.5 cm. Scape closely branched distally, 8–12-flowered, taller than foliage. Flowers often remaining open into night, fragrance strongly sweet, lemony; perianth tube shortly funnelform, 1.5–2.5 cm; tepals uniformly pale to bright lemon yellow, veins parallel; outer tepals 5–7 × 1–1.3 cm, margins smooth; inner tepals 5–7.5 × 1–2 cm, margins smooth; filaments 3–3.5 cm; anthers 2–3 mm; ovary 5–6 mm; style white to yellow, 7–8 cm; pedicel 2–4 mm. Capsules fully developed, oblong-elliptic, (2–)3–4 × (1–)1.5–2 cm. Seeds black, round or angular by compression, 3–5 mm, shiny. 2n = 22.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Hemerocallis flava (Linnaeus) Linnaeus; H. lilioasphodelus var. flava Linnaeus.
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Synonym

Hemerocallis flava (Linnaeus) Linnaeus
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Ecology

Habitat

Roadsides, waste places, open woods; 0--500m.
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Forests, thickets, meadows, grasslands, slopes along valleys; 100--2000 m.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering summer.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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Wikipedia

Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus

Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus, (syn. Hemerocallis flava, Lemon Day-lily Lemon Lily, Yellow Day-lily) is a plant of the genus Hemerocallis. It is found across China, in Europe in N.E. Italy and Slovenia and is one of the first daylilies used for breeding.[1]

Culinary use

The flowers of some daylillies, including Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus are edible and are used in Chinese cuisine. They are sold (fresh or dried) in Asian markets as gum jum or golden needles (金针 in Chinese; pinyin: jīnzhēn) or yellow flower vegetables (黃花菜 in Chinese; pinyin: huánghuācài). They are used in hot and sour soup, daylily soup (金針花湯), Buddha's delight, and moo shu pork. The young green leaves and the tubers of some (but not all[citation needed]) species are also edible. The plant has also been used for medicinal purposes. Care must be used as some species of lilies can be toxic. Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus has been grown by U.K permaculture expert Ken Fern since the early nineties in his "Plants For a Future" organisation.

Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus grows in big spreading clumps and its leaves grow to 75 cm (30 in) long. It has lemon-yellow flowers with a sweet scent in a cluster of 3 to 9 flowers.[1]

Gallery

References

  1. ^ a b "Botanica. The Illustrated AZ of over 10000 garden plants and how to cultivate them", p 440. Könemann, 2004. ISBN 3-8331-1253-0


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Notes

Comments

Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus was an early introduction to Europe, where it naturalized, and then to North America (W. J. Dress 1955; Hu S. Y. 1968; W. B. Zomlefer 1998). This diploid species escapes only sporadically, unlike the more aggressive H. fulva, with true naturalization frequently questioned (W. B. Zomlefer 1998).
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Comments

The flowers are steamed and then dried as a traditional food in China.
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