Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Macromia taeniolata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Macromia taeniolata

Macromia taeniolata, the Royal River Cruiser is a species of dragonfly in family Macromiidae.[1] It is a long, slender insect with bright green eyes and a dark brown body with yellow stripes. The sexes are alike.[2] It is found along large streams and rivers.[2]

References

  1. ^ "North American Odonata". University of Puget Sound. 2009. http://www.pugetsound.edu/academics/academic-resources/slater-museum/biodiversity-resources/dragonflies/north-american-odonata/. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  2. ^ a b Beaton, Giff (2007). Dragonflies and Damselflies of Georgia and the Southeast. University of Georgia Press. ISBN 0-8203-2795-6.
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