EOL News

Announcing TraitBank

The Encyclopedia of Life team today announces the availability of TraitBank, a comprehensive, searchable and open digital repository for organism traits, measurements, interactions and other facts for all species and groups of species. Read the full announcement here.

January 27, 2014 20:32

One Species at a Time Podcast: Giant Squid

Giant Squid live in the deep sea and are rarely seen by humans. Recently, however, Japanese fisherman accidentally captured a still living Giant Squid (it died soon after being brought to the surface). Although glimpsing a living Giant Squid is more cephalopod excitement than most of us can ever hope for, visitors to the Smithsonian Institution's Museum of Natural History can see two beautifully preserved and displayed specimens from Spain, a large female and a smaller male. How did they get here? A one-ton, 26-foot squid can't fit in your carry-on luggage. Listen to Encyclopedia of Life’s One Species at a Time podcast about how museum exhibit designers transported this enormous animal from Spain to Washington, D.C. in an effort dubbed "Operation Calamari".

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The One Species at a Time podcast series is supported by the Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology.

January 22, 2014 05:00

One Species at a Time Podcast: Red Paper Lantern Jellyfish

New results reported by the National Oceanography Centre suggest that 38 percent of deep ocean life in the North Atlantic could be lost over the next century due to a reduction of plant and animal life in the upper levels of the oceans that feed deep-sea life. Listen to Encyclopedia of Life’s One Species at a Time podcast about the Red Lantern Jellyfish, found about 800 meters below the sea surface, to learn more about how ocean life at various depths is interconnected and how it is being impacted by a changing climate.

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Listen to the podcast

Meet the scientists in the podcast

The One Species at a Time podcast series is supported by the Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology.

January 08, 2014 18:47