Education

Podcasts - Impacts

Pollution, deforestation, habitat loss and climate change are just a few of the consequences of the rapid development of the world by humans. This collection of podcasts highlights topics related to human impacts on biodiversity and the work scientists, students and the general public are doing to minimize these impacts. 

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Corals, Acropora (Coral bleaching)

Coral reefs are bustling cities of marine life, until rising ocean temperatures turn them into ghost towns. Can reefs spring back from devastating bleaching events? 
Lesson Plan (Partner: Listenwise)
EOL page  Transcript   Scientist Interview

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Water Hyacinth



It may have pretty purple flowers, but Eichhornia crassipes can be a green menace. Introduced to Africa from the neotropics, this invasive weed is choking Lake Victoria, the world’s second largest lake.
EOL page   Transcript     Scientist interview

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Beetles and Moths



Tiny stowaways like the European Gazelle beetle are arriving on container ships and wreaking havoc with native ecosystems. Long-standing pests like the gypsy moth have been joined by new exotic species that are crowding out North American fauna.
EOL page   Transcript     Scientist interview

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Starlings



In this podcast we hear a story in two acts about a very familiar bird—the common starling. It's a non-native species that is omnivorous, gregarious, adaptable, and highly successful in its adopted land. It turns out we humans have inadvertently put out the welcome mat for this alien species.
EOL page   Transcript     Scientist interview

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Red Swamp Crawfish, Procambarus clarkii (Commerce)

In this story, one species takes a journey that is nothing less than a circumnavigation powered by biology, and by business.


Lesson Plan (Partner: National Geographic)
EOL page  Transcript   Scientist Interview

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Dolphins, Stenella (Fishing/Bycatch)


Biologist Matt Leslie brings us a story about tuna, the intertwined fate of fisheries and dolphins, and the work of scientists.
Lesson Plan (Partners: Listenwise and Encyclopedia of Earth)
EOL page  Transcript   Scientist Interview  

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Muskox, Ovibos moschatus (Climate change)


Introduced to Norway from Greenland in the 1940s, muskoxen flourished on these cool, dry slopes until 2006, when the seemingly healthy animals began to die.
EOL page  Transcript   Scientist Interview

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Ugandan Butterflies, Pieridae (Climate change)

Change can be measured in many ways—in the inches of rainfall, acres of forest cleared—or the span of a tiny butterfly’s wings.
EOL page  Transcript   Scientist Interview

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Red Paper Lantern Jellyfish, Pandea rubra (Ocean acidification)

The red paper lantern jelly is teaching researchers in Japan how intricately life is connected down in the ocean’s deep, dark depths.
EOL page  Transcript   Scientist Interview