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Insect Orders Memory Game

Last updated 3 months ago

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    Image of Leptura maculata

    Image of Leptura maculata

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    Head - magnified

    Image of Ctenophthalmus nobilis

    Rodent Flea, Ctenophthalmus nobilis. Fleas are obligate ectoparasites of mammals and birds. Both males and females use piercing-sucking mouthparts to feed on the blood of their host. Some species are vectors of human disease including plague (Yersinia pestis) and murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi).

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    Lateral view - enlarged - grey background

    Image of Hystrichopsylla talpae talpae

    Mole Flea, Megabothris turbidus. Fleas are obligate ectoparasites of mammals and birds. Both males and females use piercing-sucking mouthparts to feed on the blood of their host. Some species are vectors of human disease including plague (Yersinia pestis) and murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi).

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    Image of Megabothris turbidus

    Image of Megabothris turbidus

    Mouse Flea, Megabothris turbidus. Fleas are obligate ectoparasites of mammals and birds. Both males and females use piercing-sucking mouthparts to feed on the blood of their host. Some species are vectors of human disease including plague (Yersinia pestis) and murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi).

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    Image of Xenopsylla cheopis

    Image of Xenopsylla cheopis

    Oriental Rat Flea, Megabothris turbidus. Fleas are obligate ectoparasites of mammals and birds. Both males and females use piercing-sucking mouthparts to feed on the blood of their host. Some species are vectors of human disease including plague (Yersinia pestis) and murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi).

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    Image of Boreus westwoodi

    Image of Boreus westwoodi

    Snow Scorpionfly, Boreus westwoodi. Mecopterans range from 3-30 mm in length and have caterpillar-like larvae. Adults are mostly carnivorous on smaller insects, but will also eat some plant parts. Males court females by attracting them with pheromones and offering a food gift.

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    Image of Panorpa cognata

    Image of Panorpa cognata

    Scorpion Fly, Panorpa cognata. Mecopterans range from 3-30 mm in length and have caterpillar-like larvae. Adults are mostly carnivorous on smaller insects, but will also eat some plant parts. Males court females by attracting them with pheromones and offering a food gift.

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    Scorpion Fly. Panorpa communis. Mecoptera

    Image of Panorpa communis

    Scorpion Fly, Panorpa communis. Mecopterans range from 3-30 mm in length and have caterpillar-like larvae. Adults are mostly carnivorous on smaller insects, but will also eat some plant parts. Males court females by attracting them with pheromones and offering a food gift.

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    Image of Panorpa communis

    Image of Panorpa communis

    Scorpion Fly, Panorpa communis. Mecopterans range from 3-30 mm in length and have caterpillar-like larvae. Adults are mostly carnivorous on smaller insects, but will also eat some plant parts. Males court females by attracting them with pheromones and offering a food gift.

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    File:Panorpa communis wwalas 3.jpg

    Image of Panorpa communis

    Scorpion Fly, Panorpa communis. Mecopterans range from 3-30 mm in length and have caterpillar-like larvae. Adults are mostly carnivorous on smaller insects, but will also eat some plant parts. Males court females by attracting them with pheromones and offering a food gift.

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    Scorpion Fly. Panorpa communis. Mecoptera

    Image of Panorpa communis

    Scorpion Fly, Panorpa communis. Mecopterans range from 3-30 mm in length and have caterpillar-like larvae. Adults are mostly carnivorous on smaller insects, but will also eat some plant parts. Males court females by attracting them with pheromones and offering a food gift.

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    Male - lateral view - highly enlarged - grey background

    Image of Elenchus tenuicornis

    Twisted-wing parasite, Elenchus tenuicornis, male. The Strepsiptera are obligate parasites of other insects. They have extreme sexual dimorphism. The short-lived males are free-living and winged, while females are wingless and resemble larvae.

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    File:Stylops melittae m2.jpg

    Image of Strepsiptera

    Twisted-winged parasite, Stylops melittae, male. The Strepsiptera are obligate parasites of other insects. They have extreme sexual dimorphism. The short-lived males are free-living and winged, while females are wingless and resemble larvae.

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    File:Andrena vaga m Stylops melittae fm3.JPG

    Image of Strepsiptera

    Twisted wing parasites, Stylops melittae mating on a sand bee, Andrena vaga. The Strepsiptera are obligate parasites of other insects. They have extreme sexual dimorphism. The short-lived males are free-living and winged, while females are wingless and resemble larvae.

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    Image of Melolontha melolontha

    Image of Melolontha melolontha

    European Cockchafer, Melolontha melolontha. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Image of Phyllopertha horticola

    Image of Phyllopertha horticola

    Bracken Chafer, Phyllopertha horticola. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Image of Lucanus cervus cervus

    Image of Lucanus cervus cervus

    Stag Beetle, Lucanus cervus. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Oxysternon festivum female

    Image of Oxysternon festivum

    Dung Beetle, Oxysternon festivum. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Image of Selatosomus cruciatus

    Image of Selatosomus cruciatus

    Click Beetle, Selatosomus cruciatus. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Image of Selatosomus aeneus

    Image of Selatosomus aeneus

    Click Beetle, Selatosomus aeneus. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Calopteron reticulatum

    Image of Calopteron reticulatum

    The Net-winged Beetle, Calopteron reticulatum. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Image of Psallidium maxillosum

    Image of Psallidium maxillosum

    The weevil Psallidium maxillosum. Weevils belong to the order Coleoptera. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Acorn Weevil (Curculio glandium)

    Image of Curculio glandium

    Acorn Weevil, Curculio glandium. Weevils belong to the order Coleoptera, the Beetles. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Image of Otiorhynchus ligustici

    Image of Otiorhynchus ligustici

    Lovage Weevil, Otiorhynchus ligustici. Weevils belong to the order Coleoptera, the Beetles. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Image of Coccinella miranda

    Image of Coccinella miranda

    Ladybird Beetle, Coccinella miranda. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Image of Myzia oblongoguttata

    Image of Myzia oblongoguttata

    Ladybird Beetle, Myzia oblongoguttata. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Image of Psyllobora vigintiduopunctata

    Image of Psyllobora vigintiduopunctata

    22-spot Ladybird Beetle larva, Psyllobora vigintiduopunctata. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Stolas discoides (Linné, 1758)

    Image of Stolas discoides

    Leaf beetle, Stolas discoides. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    File:Lilioceris lilii02.jpg

    Image of Lilioceris lilii

    Lily Leaf Beetle, Lilioceris lilii. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Image of Pilemostoma fastuosa

    Image of Pilemostoma fastuosa

    Tortoiseshell Beetle, Pilemostoma fastuosa. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Stolas mannerheimi (Boheman, 1850)

    Image of Stolas mannerheimi

    Leaf beetle, Stolas mannerheimi. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Image of Lytta vesicatoria vesicatoria and Lytta ve...

    Image of Lytta vesicatoria and 1 other taxon

    The Spanishfly, Lytta vesicatoria, is actually a beetle. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Lumberer

    Image of Eleodes

    Pinacate beetle, genus Eleodes. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    File:Somaticus aeneus.jpg

    Image of Somaticus aeneus

    Namibian Tar Darkling Beetle, Somaticus aeneus. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Large Armoured Darkling Beetle (Anomalipus elephas)

    Image of Anomalipus elephas

    Large Armoured Darkling Beetle, Anomalipus elephas. The most unusual property of beetles is not some aspect of their structure or natural history, but their sheer number. There are more known species of Coleoptera than any other group of organisms, with over 350,000 described species.

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    Owlfly

    Image of Megacmonotus magnus

    Owlfly, Megacmonotus magnus. Owlflies belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.

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    mantis lacewing (Campion impressus)

    Image of Campion impressus and 1 other taxon

    Mantidfly, Campion impressus. Mantidflies belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.

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    Libelloides coccajus MJ170513-444

    Image of Libelloides coccajus

    Owlfly, Libelloides coccajus. Owlflies belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.

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    Campion tenuistriga

    Image of Campion tenuistriga

    Mantidfly, Campion tenuistriga. Mantidflies belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.

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    Image of Chrysopa perla

    Image of Chrysopa perla

    Chrysopid lacewing, Chrysopa perla. Lacewings belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.

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    Glenoleon pulchellus

    Image of Glenoleon pulchellus

    Antlion, Glenoleon pulchellus. Antlions belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.

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    Image of Drepanepteryx phalaenoides

    Image of Drepanepteryx phalaenoides

    Hemerobiid lacewing, Drepanepteryx phalaenoides. Lacewings belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.

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    Image of Hemerobius humulinus

    Image of Hemerobius humulinus

    Hemerobiid lacewing, Hemerobius humulinus. Lacewings belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.

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    Image of Palpares libelluloides

    Image of Palpares libelluloides

    Antlion, Palpares libelluloides. Antlions belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.

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    Image of Climaciella brunnea

    Image of Climaciella brunnea

    Mantidfly, Climaciella brunnea. Mantidflies belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.

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    Image of Chrysoperla carnea

    Image of Chrysoperla carnea

    Chrysopid lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea. Lacewings belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.

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    Ankylopteryx rieki

    Image of Ankylopteryx rieki

    Chrysopid lacewing, Ankylopteryx rieki. Lacewings belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.

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    Image of Nemoptera sinuata

    Image of Nemoptera sinuata

    Thread-winged Lacewing, Nemoptera sinuata. Lacewings belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.

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    Nemoptera bipennis

    Image of Nemoptera bipennis

    Thread-winged Lacewing, Nemoptera bipennis. Lacewings belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.

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    Thread-winged Lacewing

    Image of Nemoptera bipennis

    Thread-winged Lacewing, Nemoptera bipennis. Lacewings belong to the order Neuroptera. Adult Neuroptera are medium-sized to large, soft-bodied insects with four delicate membranous wings. Neuropteran larvae are active predators with large mandibles that are greatly modified for piercing and sucking. The larvae of some groups feed on agricultural and garden pests and are sold commercially as biological control agents.