Collection image

Plants of Economic Importance

Last updated 5 months ago

  • 91914_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Mangifera indica

    Mango

    Source of mango fruit.

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 19055_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Pistacia vera

    Pistachio Nut

    P. vera goes by many common names, such as Common Pistache, Pistachio Nut, Terebinth Nut or Green Almond. Although it has been associated with traditional medicinal uses in China and India, it is most widely bought and sold for use in food (Khare 2007). The seeds yield 40% non- drying oil but the oil is not commercially produced because the seed already has such a high commercial value on its own (Facciola 1990). Additionally, male trees yield a small amount of high quality resin that is used as an ingredient in paints and lacquers (Lim 2012; Komarov 2000).

    References:
    • Khare, CP. 2007. “Indian Medicinal Plants: An Illustrated Dictionary” (Springer)
    • Facciola, Stephen. 1990. “Cornucopia: A Source Book of Edible Plants” (Kampong Publications)
    • Komarov, VL. 2000 “Flora of the U.S.S.R” (Amerind Publishing Co.)
    • William M. Ciesla for the Forestry and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. 2002 “Non-Wood Products from Temperate Broad Leaf Trees” part of a series Non-Wood Forest Products 13 (FAO Cooperate Document Repository)
    • TK Lim. 2012 “Edible Medicinal and Non-Medicinal Plants, vol. 1, Fruits”

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 95568_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Spondias

    Spanish Plums

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 65010_88_88 cellular organisms > Anacardiaceae

    Spondias radlkoferi

    One of the species commonly known as the hogplum, it is eatten by humans.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 50540_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Spondias mombin

    Java Plum

    One of the species known as hog plum, its fruit and leaves are used in Thai cusine while its roots, bark and leaves are used medicinally in Suriname, Ivory Coast and parts of Nigeria.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."
    The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Trees and Shrubs: An Essential Guide To Trees and Shrubs of the World. MobileReference 2008.

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 45480_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Spondias purpurea

    Purple Mombin

    One of the species of plant called hogplum, it is cultivated for its lumber as well as its fruit.

    References:
    Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad Costa Rica (INBio)
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 18477_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Schinus molle

    Peruvian Peppertree

    Its fruit can be ground to use as a spice and is sometimes used to adulterate black peper. Berries can and have tradddtionally been pounded to make a weak alchoholic drink in South America. It is insecticidal, anti-inflamatory, anti-bacterial and can be used as an antiseptic. It has received attention for its pest control potential and the antidepressant like qualities of it's leaf extract.

    References:
    Blood, Kate. (2001) Environmental weeds: a field guide for SE Australia, Mount Waverley, Victoria, Australia.
    Machado, Daniele G. et al. (2006) Antidepressant-like effect of the extract from leaves of Schinus molle L. in mice: Evidence for the involvement of the monoaminergic system.
    Ferrero, Adriana et. al. (2007) Acute and subacute toxicity evaluation of ethanolic extract from fruits of Schinus molle in rats.

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 73403_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Schinus terebinthifolius

    Brazilian Pepper Tree

    The fruits of this plant are used to adulterate black pepper.

    References:
    Bennett, B. C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 85858_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Toxicodendron vernicifluum

    Varnish Tree

    Also known as the lacquer tree, it is the source of urushi lacquer.

    References:
    Bennett, B. C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 99645_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Semecarpus anacardium

    Markingnut Tree

    Sap from the unripe fruit of this tree is used to make dye.

    References:
    Bennett, B. C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 99948_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Schinopsis

    A genus of South American trees harvested for tannins.

    References:
    Bennett, B. C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families,"

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 05373_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Rhus

    Sumac

    One of the genera within Anacardiaceae that is harvested for tanins.

    References:
    Bennett, B.G. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 24313_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Anacardium

    One of the genera of Anacardiaceae which is routinely harvested for timber.

    References:
    Bennett, B. C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 59909_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Campnosperma

    One of the genera of Anacardiaceae harvested for timber.

    References:
    Bennett, B. C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 66924_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Gluta

    One of the genera of Anacardiaceae that is harvested for timber.

    References:
    Bennett, B. C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 93714_88_88 Anacardiaceae

    Koordersiodendron

    One of the genera of Anacardiaceae that is harvested for timber.

    References:
    Bennett, B. C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 85771_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Metopium

    Florida Poisontree

    One of the genera of Anacardiaceae that is harvested for timber.

    References:
    Bennett, B. C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 60804_88_88 Plantae > Anacardiaceae

    Tapirira

    One of the genera of Anacardiaceae that is harvested for timber.

    References:
    Bennett, B. C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Anacardiaceae

  • 39981_88_88 Plantae > Apiaceae

    Coriandrum sativum

    Coriander

    A member of the family Apiaceae (Umbellifera) with uses as a culiinary herb or spice.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbellifera)

  • 35014_88_88 Plantae > Apiaceae

    Cuminum cyminum

    Cumin

    A member of the family Apiaceae (Umbellifera) with culinary uses as an herb or spice.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbellifera)

  • 05237_88_88 Plantae > Apiaceae

    Anethum graveolens

    Dill

    A member of the family Apiaceae (Umbellifera) with uses as a culinary herb or spice.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbellifera)

  • 57164_88_88 Plantae > Apiaceae

    Petroselinum crispum

    Parsley

    A member of the familly Apiaceae (Umbellifera) with uses as a culinary herb or spice.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbellifera)

  • 87330_88_88 Plantae > Apiaceae

    Carum carvi

    Common Caraway

    A member of the family Apiaceae (Umbellifera) with culinary uses as an herb or spice.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbellifera)

  • 98519_88_88 Plantae > Apiaceae

    Daucus carota

    Queen Anne's Lace

    A member of the family Apiaceae (Umbellifera) with culinary uses as an herb or spice.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbellifera)

  • 35670_88_88 Plantae > Apiaceae

    Apium graveolens

    Celery

    A member of the family Apiaceae (Umbellifera) that is widely cultivated as a vegetable.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbellifera)

  • 28275_88_88 Plantae > Apiaceae

    Foeniculum vulgare

    Fennel

    A member of the family Apiaceae (Umbellifera) with culinary uses as an herb or spice.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbellifera)

  • 32271_88_88 Plantae > Apiaceae

    Pastinaca sativa

    Parsnip

    A member of the family Apiaceae (Umbellifera) it has culinary uses as an herb or spice.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbellifera)

  • 79197_88_88 Plantae > Apiaceae

    Angelica sinensis

    Women's Ginseng

    A member of the family Apiaceae (Umbellifera) with well known gynecological uses in traditional Chinese medicine; it is also known as dong quai and "women's ginseng."

    References:
    Bennett, B. C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbellifera)

  • 53045_88_88 Plantae > Apiaceae

    Centella asiatica

    Spadeleaf

    A member of the family Apiaceae (Umbellifera) with well known medicinal uses, it is also called gotu kola.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbellifera)

  • 41818_88_88 Plantae > Apiaceae

    Conium maculatum

    Hemlock

    A member of the family Apiaceae (Umbellifera) that contains the neurotoxin coniine. It was implicated in Socrates' death.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbellifera)

  • Plantae > Apiaceae

    Arracacia xanthorrhiza

    Arracacha

    A member of the family Apiaceae (Umbellifera) that is cultivated as a crop in and around the Andes.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbellifera)

  • 13101_88_88 Plantae > Apiaceae

    Eryngium foetidum

    Culantro

    A member of the family Apiaceae (Umbellifera) that is used as a culinary herb or spice.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbellifera)

  • 57884_88_88 Plantae > Apiaceae

    Pimpinella anisum

    Anise

    A member of the family Apiaceae (Umbelliferae) with uses as a culinary herb or spice.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Apiaceae (Umbelliferae)

  • 52707_88_88 Plantae > Araceae

    Colocasia esculenta

    Taro

    "Taro (Colocasia esculenta), believed to be one of the world's oldest food crops, was traditionally the main root crop of Samoa and was the preferred starchy staple until the cyclones of the 1990s. However, the impact of the cyclones followed by the rapid spread of taro leaf blight (Phytophthera colocasiae) resulted in a major decline in production, particularly as all cultivars proved susceptible to the disease. Whereas taro was once the largest export commodity, generating more than half of all export revenue in 1993, it currently accounts for less than one per cent of export revenue."

    Source: New Agriculturalist: A taro tale.

    Sort value: Araceae

  • 29709_88_88 Plantae > Araceae

    Xanthosoma sagittifolium

    Yautia-blanca

    "Central and South Americans use the tubers of elephant ear tubers in various meals. The tuber is one of the most popular foods in the country and provides a basic diet for many. The tubers can be harvested and stored for several weeks if refrigerated. Elephant ear is cultivated in many of the Central and South American countries. Taro is native to Africa and was brought as a food crop for slaves. It is also widely eaten in many areas of the Pacific."

    Source: University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) Extension: Elephant Ear

    Sort value: Araceae

  • 08148_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Elaeis guineensis

    African Oil Palm

    It is the most widely cultivated species of the family Arecaceae (Palmae) and yields up to 250kg of palm kernel oil and 500kg of palm kernel meal per hectare of the plant.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)

  • 41077_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Phoenix dactylifera

    Date Palm

    A member of the family Arecaceae (Palmae) they are among the oldest cultivated tree crops and and provide many products including food. Yearly production estimates are as high as 4,000,000 tons of fruit per year.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)

  • 31448_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Cocos nucifera

    Coconut

    A member of the family Arecaceae (Palmae), it is commonly known as a coconut palm and has many uses. The hard endosperm of the seed is edible when fresh and can also be dried to produce copia. The liquid endosperm of the immature fruit, often called "coconut water" is potable and readily consumable when fresh and has recently become a popular commercial beverage in the United States. The beverage known as "coconut milk" can be produced by grating the coconut with hot water. It is also used in the production of non-edible products such as bowls, bags, hats and cosmetics.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)

  • 20684_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Bactris gasipaes

    Pupunha

    Bactris gasipaes (peach palm) is a major staple for many Central American cultures as well as many cultures from the Northern part of South America. Its harvest is celebrated by the Shuar of Amazonian Ecuador with a well noted festival.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)

  • 25562_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Hyphaene thebaica

    Doum Palm

    A member of the family Arecaceae (Palmae), it is native to the Nile region and was considered a sacred tree in ancient Egypt. It produces edible fruits and it's seeds are often eaten as vegetables.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)

  • 53683_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Metroxylon sagu

    Sago Palm

    Metroxylonsagu (sago palm) is an important food plant, which is evidenced by the Indonesian saying that where a sago palm grows “nobody ever goes hungry.” Starch can be extracted from it by soaking pieces of stem the plant’s stem in water.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)

  • 98266_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Arenga pinnata

    Sugar Palm

    Arenga pinnata (sugar palm) is a source of jaggery, also known as "palm sugar."

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)

  • 49991_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Euterpe

    Palm

    The apical meristems of many species in this geneus are prefered sources of palm hearts.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)

  • 11036_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Astrocaryum standleyanum

    Black Palm

    Astrocaryum standleyanum is an important source of fiber and its leaves are used by Wounaan and Emberá peoples of Panama (also known as Chocó) to weave baskets, some of which they sell commercially.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)

  • 79248_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Serenoa repens

    Saw Palmetto

    This plant is noted for its ability to effectively treat benign prostatic hyperplasia. Additionaly, Serenoa repens' petiole fibers are used by the Seminoles of southern Florida to make dolls.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)

  • 00385_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Calamus

    Calamus

    Calamus is a genus of Old World climbers that produce rattan, a structural material used to make furniture of the same name.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)

  • 37386_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Desmoncus

    Desmoncus is a New World genus used similarly to the Old World genus Calamus which is to say it often provides structural material generally used in furniture.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)

  • 03310_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Copernicia prunifera

    Carnauba Wax Palm

    Copernicia prunifera, also known as Copernicia cerifera, is a palm commonly used for the Carnauba wax that can be extracted from its leaves.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)

  • 41386_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Areca catechu

    Areca Palm

    Areca catechu (betel nut palm) is chewed for its stimulating effects because of its muscarinic agonistic alkaloids.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., "Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families"

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)

  • 32011_88_88 Plantae > Arecaceae

    Phytelephas aequatorialis

    Ecuadorian Ivory Palm

    The speices Phytelephas aequatorialis is one of multiple that provide tagua, a material also known as vegetable ivory. It is commonly used in crafting and jewelry.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. "Twenty-five Economically Important Plant Families."

    Sort value: Arecaceae (Palmae)